Henry Matos - Coco, Early & Associates


As a home seller, it sometimes can be tough to balance short- and long-term goals. Lucky for you, we're here to help you streamline your house selling efforts and ensure you can maintain your focus as you proceed along the property selling journey.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you stay on course after you list your residence.

1. Establish a Home Selling Timeline

A home selling timeline can help you take the guesswork out of selling your residence. This timeline enables you to determine what tasks you will need to complete as you navigate the property selling journey. Plus, it can help you get a good idea about how much time you will need to sell your residence.

Be flexible with your home selling timeline. Remember, unexpected problems may arise at any point during the home selling journey, and these issues may slow you down. But if you maintain flexibility, you can address any potential home selling hurdles and finish the home selling journey as quickly as possible.

2. Create Home Selling Goals

With home selling goals in place, you can achieve many milestones throughout the property selling journey. These goals can help you stay focused as you complete each step of the home selling process. They also enable you to enjoy a sense of accomplishment as you finish a wide range of tasks when you sell your home.

You can create as many or as few home selling goals as you'd like. As you set up goals, you should consider the steps that you'll need to complete as well. This may allow you to further accelerate the home selling journey.

3. Work with a Real Estate Agent

If you are unsure about what to expect during the home selling journey, you may want to find a real estate agent. Because if you have a real estate agent at your side, you can get the help you need to maintain your focus throughout the property selling journey.

A real estate agent understands exactly what it takes to sell a home in any real estate market, at any time. First, he or she will help you establish a home selling strategy. This housing market professional next will promote your residence to potential buyers and help you review any offers to purchase your home. And if you accept an offer to purchase, a real estate agent will make it simple for you to complete the final steps of the property selling journey.

Let's not forget about the expert guidance that a real estate agent provides, either. A real estate agent is happy to respond to a home seller's concerns and questions. As a result, a real estate agent will help a home seller make informed decisions as the property selling journey progresses.

Maintain your focus as you sell your home – use the aforementioned tips, and you can remain on track throughout the house selling journey.


Homeowners put a lot of time, money, and effort into maintaining, updating, and decorating their homes. So, when it’s time to sell it can be frustrating to receive a lowball offer on your home.

Many sellers aren’t sure how to react to a low offer. However, with so much at stake it’s important to go into selling your home with a plan.

In this article, we’re going to talk about how to handle a low offer on your home so that you can capitalize on even the less-than-ideal prospects when selling your house.

Every offer deserves a polite response

So, you’ve gotten an offer on your home that you consider to be way too low. The first thing you need to do is to detach your emotions from the situation so that you can formulate a polite, but appropriate response.

It is the custom of many people around the world to negotiate. And one common practice in negotiation is to start with a low offer. Therefore, don’t be offended if you receive an offer that is low as it likely isn’t meant as an insult to you or your home.

We understand that selling can be frustrating, so if you need to vent, talk it over with your family or agent. Together you’ll be able to get past the initial frustration and come up with a quick, practical response to the offer.

Counter the offer anyway

Even if you think there’s a small chance that the prospective buyer will raise their offer to fit your requirements, it’s still worth providing a counter offer. This will make it clear to the buyer that you have received their offer and considered it.

Failing to provide a counter offer could mean you miss out on a serious offer in some cases, so it’s worth the small amount of time it takes to provide.

Don’t waste too much time negotiating

So, you’ve sent a counter offer and have received a response that still isn’t getting anywhere close to what you’re looking for. Now what?

In this situation, it’s best to send a concise and cordial message to the buyer that you won’t be able to adjust your offering price any further and then thank them for their time. After this point, it likely isn’t worth your time to continue negotiating.

Low offers can be helpful

If you’re getting a lot of low offers and none in the range you hope for, it could be time to reconsider a few things. You might want to try a new approach, such as staging the home or highlighting certain details that you may have missed. If your listing photos aren’t up to par you can upload new ones that are higher quality with better lighting.

Next, see if the comparable listings in your area have gone down in price. A substantial change in the local market since the time you listed your property is, in some cases, enough to influence the offers you receive.


For home sellers who want to accomplish the optimal results, it is important to remain open to negotiations with buyers. There are many reasons why home sellers should negotiate with buyers, and these include:

1. You can accelerate the house selling journey.

If your mission is to sell your house as quickly as possible, you should be open to negotiating with a buyer. Because if you can negotiate a home purchase agreement, you can move one step closer to concluding the house selling journey.

As you enter a negotiation with a homebuyer, it is important to keep your house selling goals in mind. At the same time, you should be willing to adjust your goals as needed. If you maintain flexibility throughout a negotiation with a homebuyer, you may be better equipped than ever before to enjoy a fast, profitable house selling experience.

2. You can reach an agreement that works well for both a seller and buyer.

If you find a buyer's initial offer to purchase your house falls short of your expectations, you can open up negotiations with this individual. Then, you and a buyer can work together to come to terms on a home sale agreement that suits both parties.

Of course, a negotiation with a buyer does not guarantee instant success. If you and a buyer cannot reach a home sale agreement, there is no need to worry. Even if negotiations with a buyer fail, you can wait for another offer to purchase your home that falls in line with your expectations.

3. You can get the best price for your house.

As a home seller, it is important to do everything you can to optimize your house sale earnings. If you negotiate with a buyer, you can increase the likelihood of getting the best price for your house.

Furthermore, home sellers should keep in mind that they have options during a negotiation with a buyer. If you are not satisfied with the progress of a negotiation, you can walk away from the negotiating table.

When it comes to negotiating a home sale, you may want to hire a real estate agent, too. A real estate agent understands the ins and outs of home sale negotiations and will do whatever it takes to help you achieve the best-possible results.

Typically, a real estate agent can handle a negotiation with a buyer on your behalf. This housing market professional will continue to provide status updates throughout a negotiation and do what it takes to streamline the house selling cycle. Plus, if you ever have concerns or questions during a home sale negotiation, a real estate agent can instantly respond to them.

Don't stress about negotiating the sale price of your home. If you are open to negotiating your house's sale price with a buyer, you may be able to speed up the home selling journey. Best of all, you could maximize the profit from your home sale.


Selling a home takes patience. Especially when you’re balancing your time between settling into your new home, and keeping up with your work and family life. So, when you’ve finally gotten to the point of accepting an offer on your home, you’ll probably breathe a sigh of relief--and you should!  However, there are still a few more things that will need to happen and a couple of things to consider before closing the deal on your home sale.

Contingencies on the purchase contract

A purchase contract typically includes contingency clauses that are designed to protect the interests of both the buyer and the seller. These clauses mean that the contract is contingent upon the actions being completed before it can be legally valid.

There are three main contingencies that will likely be included in the purchase contract before closing--inspection, financing, and appraisal.

Inspection contingency

The inspection contingency allows the buyer to have the home inspected by a professional before closing (the time should be specified within the contract, but the inspection should usually occur no more than two weeks after you accept the offer). A home inspection lets the buyer know what to expect in terms of repairs that the home needs now or will need in the near future.

Financing contingency

Since the vast majority of buyers will be purchasing their home through a loan, a financing contingency is included to allow the buyer time to secure their mortgage. Getting pre-qualified and pre-approved makes this process easier, but the buyer will still have to finalize and close on their mortgage before their financing is official.

This clause exists to protect the buyer in the event that their mortgage application is denied, ensuring that they aren’t penalized.

Appraisal contingency

The third contingency most often found in purchase contracts is a home appraisal. The buyer will order an appraisal and then the appraiser will reach out to you to find a day to come and value your home.

If the home is then appraised at the amount agreed upon in your contract, this contingency is met. However, if the appraisal comes up lower than the purchase amount, the buyer can renegotiate the price.

Walkthrough and closing

Once the appraisal and inspection have been met and financing secured, the buyer will have a chance to do a final walkthrough of your home. The walkthrough usually occurs no more than two days prior to closing on the sale. A walkthrough allows the buyer view the home one last time to ensure that the condition of the home hasn’t drastically changed since the home was inspected or appraised. So, make sure the buyer is aware of any changes you planned to make to the home before closing.

Now you’re ready to close on your home sale. You’ll receive a disclosure form to review (read it carefully!) and sign. Once closing is complete, ownership of the home is officially transferred to the buyer.

While the closing process does include several steps, it’s important to be available and cooperative along the way to ensure a smooth sale and transition into your new home.


Looking to add your home to the real estate market? Ultimately, you'll want to do everything you can to maximize the value of your residence.

For home sellers, getting the best price for a residence may seem virtually impossible at times. Fortunately, we're here to help you plan ahead so you can get the best price for your house as soon as it hits the market.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you optimize the value of your residence, regardless of the current real estate market's conditions.

1. Examine the Housing Market

When it comes to the real estate market, it is important to understand how your residence stacks up against the competition.

Collect housing market data to learn about the real estate sector. Then, you can establish a "competitive" price for your home and boost your chances of a quick home sale.

Typically, home sellers should look at the prices of currently available residences in their cities and towns. This will enable home sellers to understand the local real estate market and establish a price range for houses that are similar to their own.

Don't forget to review the prices of recently sold houses as well. With this housing market data in hand, home sellers can find out whether they are about to enter a seller's or buyer's market.

2. Complete a Home Appraisal

Let's face it – what your home is worth today is unlikely to match what you initially paid for your residence. If you have completed a wide range of home upgrades over the years, the value of your residence may have increased. Or, if you failed to maintain your house's interior and exterior, your residence's value may have fallen.

A home appraisal will enable you to learn about your house's strengths and weaknesses. This assessment is performed by a professional property inspector who will take a close look at your house's interior and exterior. After the assessment is finished, the property inspector will provide you with a report that can help you price your house appropriately.

If you want to boost your home's value after a home appraisal, you can always complete various home interior and exterior improvement projects. That way, you can enhance your house both inside and out and move closer to maximizing the value of your home.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is a difference-maker for home sellers, and for good reason. This housing market professional will do everything possible to help you prep your house and ensure you can receive the best price for it – without exception.

Usually, a real estate agent will set up home showings and open houses, negotiate with homebuyers on your behalf and much more. He or she will even provide honest, unbiased home selling recommendations to ensure you can streamline the home selling journey.

Don't leave anything to chance as you get ready to add your house to the real estate market. Use these tips, and you should have no trouble getting the best price for your house.




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